prettymuchjustsomestuff:

One Direction’s You and I

prettymuchjustsomestuff:

One Direction’s You and I

(via mortificat)

nbchannibal:

A starling? Quiet sheep?

*skeptically glares at Bryan Fuller*

(Source: mungbeam, via goatdick)

mothernaturenetwork:

Ancient puppy paw prints found on Roman tilesThe site in Leicester also provided archeologists with Roman tweezers, brooches, coins and samples of painted wall plaster.

mothernaturenetwork:

Ancient puppy paw prints found on Roman tiles
The site in Leicester also provided archeologists with Roman tweezers, brooches, coins and samples of painted wall plaster.

(via gaikudo)

englishsnow:

emily golitzin

(via niallar)

travelthisworld:

Bridge of Sighs
Venice, Italy | by Mike Misc

travelthisworld:

Bridge of Sighs

Venice, Italy | by Mike Misc

(via kenzotenma)

allthingseurope:

Normandy, France (by mauro.zeta)

allthingseurope:

Normandy, France (by mauro.zeta)

(via getterbeam)

scalesofperception:

Colosses | Fabrice Fouillet | Via

Statues are often idealized works of art. They are ideological, political or religious representations and attempt to turn their subjects into fascinating, eternal figures. Even when erected to keep alive the memory of a single person, a statue that lasts many generations will eventually establish itself as a symbol for the community. 

Statues are even more influential when they are monumental. An edifice can be said to be monumental when it is unusual, extraordinary and physically imposing. It has to be abnormal — as exceptional as the political or religious power itself — and also inseparable from its symbolic aspects.

The series “Colosses” is a study of the landscapes that embrace monumental commemorative statues. 

SoP | Scale of Environments

(via goatdick)

(Source: youngmaslo)

historyofromanovs:

The Ballroom of Catherine Palace, Tsarskoe Selo, Russia.
Source

historyofromanovs:

The Ballroom of Catherine Palace, Tsarskoe Selo, Russia.

Source

(via louiswstyles)